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Tag: Todd Foisy

Cold February Temperatures Break Records in Caribou

Cold February Temperatures Break Records in Caribou

| March 4, 2015

February, a month that is usually a bit milder than January, but that wasn’t the case this year. “February in Caribou was exceptionally cold. So cold in fact that it was the coldest February on record and records go back to 1939,” says Science and Operations Officer at the National Weather Service in Caribou, Todd Foisy. The […]

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The University of Maine at Fort Kent is now Storm Ready

The University of Maine at Fort Kent is now Storm Ready

| November 19, 2014

This campus is now storm ready. The University of Maine at Fort Kent now joins the University of Maine at Presque Isle and the University of Maine at Orono, in the designation of storm ready. Making it three campuses in the state with that title. When you think of storm ready, you may only think of […]

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How To Get A Proper Temperature Reading

How To Get A Proper Temperature Reading

| July 3, 2014

Taking an outside temperature is not as easy as you think it is. In order to get a proper reading, there are a few things to consider when using a thermometer. “You want to have it not near another surface, like for example, if you have a thermometer right outside your house, especially on hot […]

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Spring/Summer Workshop at the National Weather Service in Caribou

Spring/Summer Workshop at the National Weather Service in Caribou

| May 16, 2014

These forecasters are all hard at work at the National Weather Service in Caribou getting ready for the upcoming summer season. “Basically the goal is to prepare out forecasters for summer convection, so the thunderstorms, the flash flooding and all those sorts of threats that go along with summer severe weather,” says Todd Foisy the […]

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Above Normal Flood Potential for Northern Maine

Above Normal Flood Potential for Northern Maine

| April 8, 2014

With the above normal snowpack for this time of year, the flood potential is now above normal. This includes the potential for flooding due to ice jams. “We still have generally 25 to 40 inches over northern and central Maine into Western New Brunswick, and that snowpack contains a lot of water. Generally about 8 […]

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